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Workplace Injury Statistics


Injuries can occur in any workplace environment. The following statistics from the United States Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for the year 2006 outline the prevalence of different types of on-the-job injuries in various industries, showing clearly the true human costs of the unsafe working conditions that continue to plague workers in the United States today. If you or someone you love has fallen victim to a workplace injury of any kind, consider turning to a dedicated personal injury attorney to help you achieve justice.

Workplace injury statistics infographic

Workplace Injuries by Industry

Construction and manufacturing workers continue to be at the greatest risk, with about six injuries per every 100 workers in these industries in 2006. Education and health services workers followed, with 5.4 incidents among every 100 workers. Mining workers faced the third-highest risk with nearly five injuries per 100 workers. Those working in information technology and the financial sector faced the lowest risk, with less than two injuries per 100 workers in each group.

Importantly, construction workers faced a much higher incidence of on-the-job injuries requiring time away from work than any other industry. Nearly 45 percent of all injured construction workers were forced to take time off for treatment and rehabilitation, and 20 percent of those were limited in the work they could do after the construction-related injury. The median time away from work among all injured workers was seven days, with many missing weeks or months of work at a time.

Fatal Workplace Injuries

In spite of stringent safety regulations designed to minimize risks, thousands of workers die every year due to workplace injuries. If your loved one has been killed in a workplace accident, you may have grounds for a wrongful death lawsuit. Transportation workers suffered the highest number of fatal workplace accidents in 2006 with 1,501 deaths. Construction workers were second with 1,273 deaths. More than 40 percent of all workplace accidents in 2006 were vehicular accidents, with an additional 17 percent linked to accidents with workplace equipment, and 14 percent were caused by falls. Other less common causes included violent attacks from co-workers, exposure to toxic substances such as asbestos, and fires and explosions.

Locate a Personal Injury Attorney to Handle Your Case

If you or a member of your family has been injured on the job, you may be facing steep medical bills at a time when your income is diminished. You may be wondering how to cover your expenses without help. A personal injury attorney specializing in workplace injuries may be able to help you and your family obtain the money you need to get your life back on track. Please contact an experienced attorney in your area today.

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